Archive for the ‘Sheltering’ Category

Who is Doug Rae?

Thursday, January 15th, 2009

The Wednesday, January 14th Animal Care and Control board meeting offered the public the opportunity to meet Doug Rae and learn why he was chosen to resuscitate an agency suffering from neglect, dysfunction and animal killing at the animals’ and tax payers’ expense.

Sit back and listen to who is Doug Rae, what he intends to do and how he’s going to do it.

Go to:
http://indianapolis.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=26

Click on ‘Animal Care and Control Board’ 01/14/09 video
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Biggest Obstacle to success in animal welfare?

Wednesday, January 14th, 2009

On January 12, Doug Rae started his new position as administrator at Indianapolis Animal Care and Control.

When Mr. Rae was asked during the painfully long 3 week interview process, “What is the biggest obstacle to success in animal welfare?” His reply was a thoughtful and accurate, ‘Egos.’

Let us be prayerful that people with big egos and insecurities can check themselves at the door to allow Mr. Rae to help our community of Indianapolis rise to a more honorable level of animal sheltering and humanity. For the past many years, your tax dollar has been going toward killing animals. We are at the threshold of seeing this turned around if Mr. Rae is allowed to proceed without interruption.

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Indianapolis – 2009 community to watch

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

Per the Indianapolis Star Dec. 21, 2008

Nathan Winograd, director of the San Francisco-based National No-Kill Advocacy Center, which seeks to end the practice of euthanasia at U.S. animal shelters, will name Indianapolis his 2009 “community to watch” on Animal Wise Radio, which airs in Phoenix and the Twin Cities and can be heard online at www.animal wiseradio.com.

Winograd said things started looking up at Indianapolis’ shelters this fall when two new top officials joined the Humane Society of Indianapolis and more good news came last week when the city hired Philadelphia shelter chief operating officer Douglas Rae.

Rae will take the helm of Indianapolis Animal Care & Control next month and wants to cut the use of euthanasia there by 75 percent.

“Keep an eye on that shelter,” Winograd said in an interview. “I think you have some exciting things ahead.”

What is the average pay for a shelter director?

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

The wise use of financial gifts is of particular concern in animal welfare because as with any not-for-profit the concern is that the money is not actually getting to its targeted need.

Salary Survey Report for Industry: Animal Shelter

Median Salary by Job – Industry: Animal Shelter (United States)

Executive Director, Non Profit Organization $44,281
Veterinarian $64,140
Animal Control Worker $26,171
Operations Manager $36,022
Director of Development, Non Profit $41,175
Veterinary Tech / Technician $27,500
Director of Operations $45,00

http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Industry=Animal_Shelter/Salary

Executive Director, Humane Society of Indianapolis $97,689
http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=6136

Otto Ray:

“I have been a humane officer and investigator for 65 years and have lived in Indianapolis all my life; was 84 years old on March 6, 1972. I am writing this under a terrific handicap. I feel pretty helpless sitting here with a fractured hip, fractured neck, half blind, using a magnifying glass to see, have an impediment in my speech, and am compelled to use a walker when I move about.

I started exposing the humane society trustee’s bureaucracy in 1968 but at no time did I publicize the humane society’s embarrassing large assets; however because of the fact that conditions have become so bad and no one is attempting to help or speak for the poor defenseless animals who cannot speak for themselves, I am writing this article while hoping and praying that the public will demand a change of…. bureaucracy, because even the operators of any business or ball club would be removed under similar conditions. Instead of doing something for the animals they have bee n spending their time juggling facts, words, figures, numbers and everything else.”

Otto Ray July 20, 1972
(Otto Ray sold to the Crume Trust the property on which the Humane Society of Indianapolis is located)

http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/96/1/editorial.html

Saving the strays

Friday, May 9th, 2008

NUVO
Saving the strays
by Shawndra Miller Apr 16, 2008

“What new shelter policies mean for the city’s unwanted pets”

Shawndra Miller did a terrific job characterizing the landscape of animal welfare in Indianapolis, exposing the genuine players and those in masquerade.

You can read the article here:

http://nuvo.net/articles/saving_the_strays/

“Humane Society’s new way has critics”

Thursday, April 17th, 2008

“Humane Society’s new way has critics”
Critics question why Humane Society accepts transfers but not local strays
April 14, 2008
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080414/LOCAL18/804140361

The Humane Society of Indianapolis continues to drive itself into further embarrassment and isolation from the community by blatantly embracing and publicly promoting the practice of transporting dogs from out of jurisdiction while healthy, adoptable animals continue to be killed in Marion County.

This is yet another example of endless poor decision-making allowed by the board of directors with a CEO intoxicated with a position of misguided authority in the animal welfare community. Such decision-making delivers agency policies and practices that profoundly violate the very spirit of true animal welfare.

This practice is justified with a twisted explanation that animal transfers “…are part of a grander plan to make animal shelters the first option people consider when they look for a pet.” In truth, the attempt is to make only ONE shelter the first option — the one that charges the highest adoption fees and selectively offers only the most “desirable” animals while allowing other equally adoptable dogs and cats to be killed elsewhere. The only “grander plan” evident is that of one individual who appears determined to bankrupt the agency, morally and financially, while believing that public perception can be twisted to make others believe they are witnessing a strategy that is part of a “global perspective,” and that “…it seems to be working well.”

This is a narcissistic disorder of an agency that believes itself to be THE picture, rather than understanding itself as only A PART OF the bigger picture.

Support of this travesty by the Humane Society Board of Directors suggests them to be either victims of hypnotic suggestion or just asleep at the wheel. Both the animals and the donors are being grievously betrayed.

HSI says no to strays

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

The Indianapolis Star reports that the Humane Society of Indianapolis will require pet owners to undergo “surrender counselling” before accepting strays. This is a financial decision as the HSI is running in the red. While increasing pet retention through counselling and other programs is part of the No Kill equation, HSI’s decision will likely result in higher animal populations at Indianapolis Animal Care & Control’s shelter and more strays in the community. The stark difference between these two shelters has rarely been more clearly defined. HSI will continue to accept a few adoptable(profitable) animals while IACC will have the larger task of caring for all animals at taxpayer expense. It remains unclear how HSI continues to enjoy such wide support among community leaders. HSI is in a deficit situation because of it’s leadership’s longterm mismanagement. Its behavior has driven away volunteers, donors and business support for years. Posted comments on the Star article include demands for increased licensing fees, enforcement of mandatory spay/neuter laws, punishment of irresponsible pet owners and calls for more euthanasia. Move to Act advocates Nathan Winograd’s No Kill equation. This comprehensive animal welfare plan reduces animal overpopulation AND shelter kill rates. It requires a coordinated effort by government, pet owners, animal rescue groups, volunteers, feral cat TNR groups and others. Move to Act will sponsor Mr Winograd’s two day No Kill workshop in May. People who care about animal welfare will attend from all over the midwest. Other communities are working to become No Kill; will Indianapolis do the same?

Rushville

Monday, July 30th, 2007

http://www.rushvillerepublican.com/local/local_story_347193809.html

I wonder if taking animals from one kill shelter to another is nothing more than shuffling animals, er I mean merchandise, to give the appearance of good will. HSI is suffering from it’s own misadventures in animal sheltering, even currently endorsing on it’s website the killing of animals for population control (calling it euthanasia http://www.indyhumane.org/abouthsi/faqs.htm) so is it not a matter of time before 40% of these Rushville dogs will meet their demise at the end of a needle? Who will be monitoring the outcome of the fate of these dogs at the end of the day?

Would it have been so hard for the Rushville shelter administration to have taken it upon themselves to assure that the animals under their watch went to guaranteed placement organizations?

Thanks for the nice story. Let’s also also be sure we are looking at the big picture.

Warren

Problems at Newcastle Shelter

Friday, June 29th, 2007

The Henry County Humane Society shelter at Newcastle stands accused in the media of animal cruelty and mismanagement by a former employee and others. An allegation of inhumane euthanasia of dogs using intra-abdominal injection has been made. The shelter manager is accused of mismanagement of money, personnel and resources. Move to Act attended the shelter’s monthly board meeting on June 25th and has been assured that steps have been taken to avoid such problems in the future. No shelter is too big or to small as to not warrant timely review and improvement in it’s policies and procedures. Move to Act expects prompt address and resolution of these allegations in Newcastle.

Who gets the money?

Monday, June 11th, 2007

Have you ever wondered how much of your charitable donation to an animal welfare group really goes toward helping animals? The ideal charity solicits and spends your money in a responsible and transparent manner. Administrative costs are limited to maximize a good outcome. Move to Act stands in favor of responsibility and accountability among animal welfare groups. The interested reader is directed to an enlightening editorial appearing in Animal People from 1996 that is still valid. Find it at: http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/96/1/editorial.html